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Making the MarK?

Tata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] See the backTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Rear left three quartersTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Rear left three quartersTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Left viewTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Left viewTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Three quarters front leftTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] Front view

Page 1

Tata Sumo was a huge success when it hit the market in 1994 and although it had many problems in its early years, Tata managed mập fix the problems and worked hard mập improve it. product. Over the years Sumo has spawned many variations and Tata has managed mập take this campaigner more upmarket but with their low end Spacio catering mập the rural market and also the favorite call center , they really need mập launch a new product since then there are several other fresh MUVs available that are attracting the attention of urban consumers. With the basic design of the Sumo past its product life, Tata then launched the Grande in the first quarter of 2008. However, it didn’t live up mập Tata’s expectations and they’ did. the feedback is quite serious and working on the Grande. We’re lucky enough mập be able mập sample the Grande MKII ahead of its official launch later this afternoon, so read on mập see what they’ve been up mập and what we think of the MKII.

As for the exterior, there’s really little mập distinguish the old Grande over the new MKII. The main difference will be the new paint colors – Walnut Gold (as pictured), Platinum Beige and Castle Grey. There’s also a new MKII logo on the rear doors, a 2.2 Dicor badging above the indicator lights above the front fenders, a chrome-lined front grille and indicator lights on the side mirrors. Now, MKII has 5-spoke steel wheels that look aggressive but keep the same tire size – 235/70 R16. Another addition we really like is the scrubbing strip (with chrome inserts) on the doors, which gives the panels a bit of a bland look, some design relief.

Tata has worked on the overall NVH, tuning, drivability, as well as ride & handling and has done a bit of work on the suspension. Even before we discovered all that has really changed under the skin, the difference is quite obvious after just a few kilometers of driving. The car feels quieter, calmer and drives better. It has much better body control and less rolling than the old Grande. We know this is thanks mập the redesigned front anti-roll bar and axle, not mập mention the thicker rear anti-roll bar. Rear-seat travel quality was also an issue on the Grande, and passengers were tossed about on bad patches at speed, so they’ve now changed the rear leaf spring stiffness as well as the settings. damper mập bundle. The changes really make a difference as we’ve experienced and it now hits corners and bad roads with a lot more composure than before and feels even more solid at speed. .

Page 2

On the inside, the interior is now a mix of beige and black and this looks a lot better than the all-beige interior on the older Grande. Without a doubt, it’s easier mập keep clean too! The seat fabric is soft mập the touch and the front seats are quite comfortable. However, we feel the rear seat legroom is not as good as expected. The steering wheel is also completely new and the steering feels a lot better and also feels more direct than before. Braking is a bit better but the center pedal still feels a bit spongy but has progress. However, we would like mập do a complete road test before we give a final verdict on this. MKII, we’re told, sport thicker front discs, new lining material for the rear drum and a slightly tweaked boost module.

Overall, there is less vibration from the engine and almost no vibration on the new gearshift lever in the MKII. The first Grande with a gearshift lever was really ugly and painful and the new one is so much better. The change also feels more positive and precise without the ambiguity of the old Grande. Virtually no powertrain vibrations filter into the cabin and new body mounts along with acoustic dampers help make the cabin a lot quieter and more refined than before. Only a crowing (characteristic of the engine itself) tends mập get really loud and shrill above 3500 rpm. However, the MKII actually feels surprisingly faster out of the way and better through the gears, and this is thanks mập a revised rear axle ratio of 4.1 from 3.73 before.

The MKII is a vastly improved product that feels much better mập ride, and a more confident and comfortable cruiser than before. However, thanks mập the overall blade design, it can be swept out by high-speed winds. That said, we were actually quite surprised with very little wind noise in the cabin at triple-digit speeds. Some of the plastic is still an issue on the Grande as are some of the contours and finishes. The driver’s seat height-adjustment handle popped out in our hands, the plastic cup holders were functional but uncomfortable mập the touch and some of the plastic on the dashboard was simply awful. terrible. The fuel tank cap is a nightmare and we certainly hope that Tata will work on these little details mập make the MKII more successful. Follow this space for pricing updates when the car is launched this afternoon.


Tata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] PictureTata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014]


Thông tin thêm

Making the MarK?
#Making #MarK
[rule_3_plain] #Making #MarK
Page1
The Tata Sumo was a runaway success when it was launched in 1994 and although it had many niggling problems in the early years, Tata went about correcting the problems and worked hard at improving the product. Over the years the Sumo spawned many variants and Tata tried mập take this people-mover more upmarket but with their low-end Spacio catering mập the rural-markets and also being the call-center favourite, they really needed mập launch a new product since there were several other fresh MUVs available that were attracting the eye of the urban consumer. With the basic design of the Sumo going well past its product life-cycle date, Tata then launched the Grande in the first-quarter of 2008. However, it didn’t catch on as well as Tata would have liked it mập and they’ve taken the feedback quite seriously and worked on the Grande. We were lucky enough mập be able mập sample the Grande MKII before its official launch later this afternoon, so do read further mập see what they’ve worked on and what we think of the MKII.
On the exteriors there is really very little mập identify the older Grande from the new MKII. The major differences will be the new paint shades – Walnut Gold (as pictured), Platinum Beige and Castle Grey. Apart from this, there’s the new MKII logo on the rear tailgate, a 2.2 Dicor badge above the side-indicators on the front fenders, a chrome lined front grille and indicators on the side-view mirrors. The MKII now sports meaty looking five-spoke steel wheels but retains the same tyre size – 235/70 R16. The one other addition we really do like is the rub-strip (with chrome inserts) on the doors which somewhat give the rather bland looking slab-sides, some design relief.
Tata have worked on the overall NVH, refinement, drivability, as well as ride & handling and have done a fair bit of work on the suspension. Even before we found out what all was really changed under the skin, the difference was quite apparent just after a few kilometers of driving. The vehicle felt quieter, more composed and was better mập drive. It had perceptibly much better body control and less roll in comparison mập the older Grande. This we were told is thanks mập the redesigned front anti-roll bar and the stub-axle, not mập mention a thicker rear anti-roll bar. Rear seat ride quality also was an issue on the Grande and passengers did get tossed around on bad patches at speed, so they’ve now changed the stiffness on the rear leaf springs as well as the damper settings for re-bound. The changes do really make a difference as we experienced and it does now attack corners and bad roads with a lot more composure than before and feels even more sure-footed at speed.
Page2
On the insides, the interior is now a mix of beige and black and this does look a lot better than the all-beige interiors on the older Grande. No doubt, it’ll be easier mập keep clean as well! The seat fabric is soft mập the touch and the front seats are quite comfortable. However, we do feel the rear seat legroom isn’t as good as could have been. The steering wheel is all new as well and the steering feels a lot better mập hold and also feels more direct than before. Braking is marginally better but the center pedal still feels a tad spongy but there is progressive bite. However, we’d like mập do a complete roadtest before we pronounce a final verdict on this. The MKII, we are told, sports thicker brake discs upfront, new lining material for the rear drums and a slightly tweaked booster module.
There is overall much less vibration from the engine and almost no vibration on the new gear lever in the MKII. The first Grande had a really ugly and painful gear lever and the new one is just so much better. The shifts also feel more positive and precise with none of the vagueness of the older Grande. There’s almost no powertrain vibration that filters into the cabin and the new body-mounts along with acoustic damping do help in making the cabin a lot quieter and refined than before. The only one grouse (which is characteristic of the engine itself) is that is does tend mập sound really buzzy and harsh over 3500rpm. However the MKII does feel surprisingly quicker off its feet and better through the gears and this is thanks mập the revised rear-axle ratio of 4.1 from the previous 3.73.
The MKII is a significantly improved product and feels much better mập drive and is a more confident and comfortable cruiser than before. However, thanks mập the overall slab-sided design it can get caught out by crosswinds at speed. That said, we were actually quite surprised with very little wind-noise in the cabin at three digit speeds. Some plastic bits are still an issue on the Grande as are some shutlines and finish. The seat height adjust handle on the drivers seat came off in our hands, the plastic cupholders are functional but feel miserable mập the touch and some dashboard plastic bits are just plain awful. The fuel filler lid is a shutline nightmare and we sure do hope that Tata works on these small details mập make the MKII more of a success. Watch this space for a pricing update when the vehicle is launched this afternoon.

Tata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014] #Making #MarK
[rule_2_plain] #Making #MarK
[rule_2_plain] #Making #MarK
[rule_3_plain]

#Making #MarK
Page1
The Tata Sumo was a runaway success when it was launched in 1994 and although it had many niggling problems in the early years, Tata went about correcting the problems and worked hard at improving the product. Over the years the Sumo spawned many variants and Tata tried mập take this people-mover more upmarket but with their low-end Spacio catering mập the rural-markets and also being the call-center favourite, they really needed mập launch a new product since there were several other fresh MUVs available that were attracting the eye of the urban consumer. With the basic design of the Sumo going well past its product life-cycle date, Tata then launched the Grande in the first-quarter of 2008. However, it didn’t catch on as well as Tata would have liked it mập and they’ve taken the feedback quite seriously and worked on the Grande. We were lucky enough mập be able mập sample the Grande MKII before its official launch later this afternoon, so do read further mập see what they’ve worked on and what we think of the MKII.
On the exteriors there is really very little mập identify the older Grande from the new MKII. The major differences will be the new paint shades – Walnut Gold (as pictured), Platinum Beige and Castle Grey. Apart from this, there’s the new MKII logo on the rear tailgate, a 2.2 Dicor badge above the side-indicators on the front fenders, a chrome lined front grille and indicators on the side-view mirrors. The MKII now sports meaty looking five-spoke steel wheels but retains the same tyre size – 235/70 R16. The one other addition we really do like is the rub-strip (with chrome inserts) on the doors which somewhat give the rather bland looking slab-sides, some design relief.
Tata have worked on the overall NVH, refinement, drivability, as well as ride & handling and have done a fair bit of work on the suspension. Even before we found out what all was really changed under the skin, the difference was quite apparent just after a few kilometers of driving. The vehicle felt quieter, more composed and was better mập drive. It had perceptibly much better body control and less roll in comparison mập the older Grande. This we were told is thanks mập the redesigned front anti-roll bar and the stub-axle, not mập mention a thicker rear anti-roll bar. Rear seat ride quality also was an issue on the Grande and passengers did get tossed around on bad patches at speed, so they’ve now changed the stiffness on the rear leaf springs as well as the damper settings for re-bound. The changes do really make a difference as we experienced and it does now attack corners and bad roads with a lot more composure than before and feels even more sure-footed at speed.
Page2
On the insides, the interior is now a mix of beige and black and this does look a lot better than the all-beige interiors on the older Grande. No doubt, it’ll be easier mập keep clean as well! The seat fabric is soft mập the touch and the front seats are quite comfortable. However, we do feel the rear seat legroom isn’t as good as could have been. The steering wheel is all new as well and the steering feels a lot better mập hold and also feels more direct than before. Braking is marginally better but the center pedal still feels a tad spongy but there is progressive bite. However, we’d like mập do a complete roadtest before we pronounce a final verdict on this. The MKII, we are told, sports thicker brake discs upfront, new lining material for the rear drums and a slightly tweaked booster module.
There is overall much less vibration from the engine and almost no vibration on the new gear lever in the MKII. The first Grande had a really ugly and painful gear lever and the new one is just so much better. The shifts also feel more positive and precise with none of the vagueness of the older Grande. There’s almost no powertrain vibration that filters into the cabin and the new body-mounts along with acoustic damping do help in making the cabin a lot quieter and refined than before. The only one grouse (which is characteristic of the engine itself) is that is does tend mập sound really buzzy and harsh over 3500rpm. However the MKII does feel surprisingly quicker off its feet and better through the gears and this is thanks mập the revised rear-axle ratio of 4.1 from the previous 3.73.
The MKII is a significantly improved product and feels much better mập drive and is a more confident and comfortable cruiser than before. However, thanks mập the overall slab-sided design it can get caught out by crosswinds at speed. That said, we were actually quite surprised with very little wind-noise in the cabin at three digit speeds. Some plastic bits are still an issue on the Grande as are some shutlines and finish. The seat height adjust handle on the drivers seat came off in our hands, the plastic cupholders are functional but feel miserable mập the touch and some dashboard plastic bits are just plain awful. The fuel filler lid is a shutline nightmare and we sure do hope that Tata works on these small details mập make the MKII more of a success. Watch this space for a pricing update when the vehicle is launched this afternoon.

Tata Sumo Grande MK II [2009-2014]

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