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Honda Amaze first drive

Honda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the backHonda Amaze [2013-2016] See the back

Introduce

Diesel oil. That’s the power of 80% of new cars sold in India today, and the diesel variants are not only more efficient but also faster than the petrol versions. Honda, as a Japanese manufacturer, has never had a wide range of diesel engines, although there has always been a 2.2-liter four-cylinder developed for the European market. However, that engine was too big for our requirements, as it was developed for the Accord and CR-V. Big H recently launched a 1.6-liter diesel Civic in Europe, and that engine has spawned the 1.5-liter i-DTEC that will power the Amaze. Welcome béo Honda’s first diesel engine for the Indian market. Will it be a winner like Hondas have always been?

Exterior

The Amaze looks proportionate in the flesh, unlike some of its images, where it looks a bit clunky in the back. The front end is all Brio except for the grille, which has two large horizontal chrome bars in it. Move around the front three-quarter view and things change dramatically. The wheels are different, the contour of the hood is different, and you can notice two prominent lines that define the contours of this car.

Seen from the side, they’re the thing that grabs your attention, which is a good thing – the Amaze refuses béo look boring, whether you like the way it looks or not. At the rear, the taillights are reminiscent of the City, and there’s a large chrome strip that runs across the trunk like the Dzire and Scala. The fit and finish are of high order and we like the new blue color Amaze is available in. There’s only a single gap between the trunk lid and the taillights, large and ungainly in an otherwise perfect car.

Interior

It’s familiar, thanks béo many elements carried over from other Honda models. The sound system has been moved from the City, not Brio. The steering wheel also has audio controls mounted on it. The driver’s seat in the top-end VX variants is height-adjustable, and Honda claims that the 50mm difference between the highest and lowest settings is the largest in the segment. The seats are comfortable and the steering wheel is adjustable for raking.

Shifting is standard Honda matter, the golf ball head holds well. Rear legroom is surprisingly good, with a bit of knee space provided by the front row’s backrests. The rear is comfortable, and we appreciate that the rear doors also feature bottle holders in addition béo pockets on the backs of the front seats. If you’re a backseat, you’ll love the Amaze for the sheer practicality it offers – you’ll have access béo rear-seat storage pockets, two door-door bottle holders, one behind the handbrake and two more cup holders in the back -armrest shelf! Legroom is also contributed by the 2405mm wheelbase, which has been increased from the Brio’s wheelbase.

Startup is another feature that will attract customers. Despite being under four meters tall, the boot is 400-litre and mostly usable, with minimal intrusion from the suspension struts. Unfortunately, for the sake of cost savings, the rear seats are not split or folded, but we can expect these features béo be added when the car is produced in large enough numbers. , for domestic consumption or export. The audio system is a capable unit, with small ergonomic tweaks like the USB connection at the bottom of the dashboard making life on a Honda a whole lot easier.

NVH from petrol or diesel is very well controlled, with petrol being completely silent at low rpm and making a lovely noise at high rpm. The diesel is on par with the competition (Honda claims it’s all-aluminium construction, which makes it hard béo contain noise and vibrations) but it’s never been so loud it’s annoying.

Power mirrors also fold electrically, but not on locked vehicles like Micra / Pulse. There isn’t any climate control, but there’s a very efficient air-con, aided by a heat-removing windscreen. Everything feels scratchy except for the new stem mounted behind the steering wheel – the left-hand finish is particularly bad, with sharp edges on many of the left-hand stalks of a vehicle. However, it’s a trunk used primarily during the monsoon, so most owners won’t find that a problem.

Engine and transmission

Be forewarned, gasoline variations are going béo be a small chunk of this article: after all, you’re not here béo find out how refined or good the gasoline is. You already know that, because it’s the same engine that powers the Brio and the Jazz. In fact, it even has the same output power of 88PS @ 6000 rpm and 109Nm @ 4500 rpm. This petrol will weigh 1005kg and 1010kg for the manual and automatic versions. Yes, the same five-speed transmission from the automatic transmission Brio is also available in the Amaze. The ARAI’s fuel efficiency figures are 18.0kmpl and 15.5kmpl respectively for the manual and automatic transmissions. It should be noted that the automatic box’s five speeds make it one of the likes of competitors like the Dzire, which has only four speeds. Curiously, the AT has a larger turning radius at 4.7 meters, while the MT version is 4.5 meters.

So the diesel engine. Let’s start with a few facts: it has 100PS @ 3600rpm and 200Nm @ 1750rpm, numbers that make it the top. Not only that, the 1498cc four-cylinder also manages a torque curve any sports car maker would boast – it’s as flat as today’s auto sales and doesn’t drop. until close béo the red line. There aren’t any high-tech culprits behind this; the engine uses a DOHC four-valve cài đặt combined with a common rail injection system capable of up béo three injections per cycle. The turbocharger is a fixed geometry provided by Honeywell and it is not a dual coil. Fuel efficiency is rated at 25.8 km/l, the highest in the country. Honda has also developed the world’s least viscous diesel engine oil for Amaze diesel engines. It is a fully synthetic oil, but it will not be as expensive as regular fully synthetic oil. Regular oil can also be used, but you can expect a 5% drop in fuel efficiency with it. Oil changes must be done every 10,000 km or six months. Another surprising fact about this i-DTEC is its construction; it’s an all-aluminum unit, which means the NVH is tough béo control, but it weighs 152kg.

This is why it took Honda so long béo launch its diesel engine; They want béo do it right the first time. And according béo the specs, it certainly looks like they did.

Ride and handle

The Amaze is more about handling than ride comfort, and that’s something we appreciate. The diesel feels stiffer thanks béo the extra weight at the nose. Suspension is on par with McPherson struts at the front and torsion beams at the rear. Brakes have a disc/drum cài đặt, like the rest in the segment. Worth mentioning in particular is the gearshift paddles; whether petrol or diesel, it will make you want béo shift gears just for the sake of low effort and a lovely positive snort when it starts. The steering is electrically assisted, but feels and responds well. It’s not as good as a hydraulic unit, but it’s one of the better electrics we’ve driven. Braking is well-balanced and progressive, although on Goa’s tight, twisty roads, the automatic’s brakes seem béo start béo fade after a while due béo the absence of the engine braking possible with Instruction book.

The tires are understandably more fuel-efficient, but the MRFs featured on our test car were surprisingly tenacious, and when the grip turned béo skid, it worked. gradual and without drama. We definitely want béo see how the Amaze performs when fully loaded, because the Civic and City have a habit of squatting in the back with five passengers and a full boot. Honda assures us that the Amaze’s belly won’t damage any accelerating cars because of its shorter wheelbase and stiffer suspension, but we’ll have béo wait for a road test béo find out. sure.

Identify

Is Amaze Really Great? We would say yes, but there is still a small problem; of price. In this segment, the entry-level sedan segment, is often a bust because of customer disloyalty béo the brand. On the other hand, Hondas always demand high premiums, not only because of their engineering, but because their sales and service are so good, they tend béo retain customers. On a driveway in Goa, a Dzire owner stopped béo see Amaze and was impressed. He is willing béo pay up béo Rs 60,000 for his Dzire béo buy an Amaze, because, in his words, “It’s a Honda anyway”. Will the rest of the market feel the same way? More importantly, is Honda going béo set such a price? That’s what will make or break Amaze’s fortunes. It won’t take us long béo find out.

Edit: Honda has launched Amaze with a starting price of Rs 4.99 lakh, in the old showroom, Delhi. The diesel VX variant that you have read about on these pages is priced at Rs 7.60 lakh, at the second hand showroom, Delhi, making it really very competitively priced. Should you buy one if you’re looking for a small diesel sedan? Of course – it’s the best in the segment right now. For more on pricing, click here.

Honda Amaze [2013-2016] PictureHonda Amaze [2013-2016]


Thông tin thêm

Honda Amaze first drive
#Honda #Amaze #drive
[rule_3_plain] #Honda #Amaze #drive
Introduction
Diesel. It is what powers eighty per cent of new cars sold in India today, and diesel variants are proving not only more efficient, but quicker than their petrol counterparts as well. Honda, as a Japanese manufacturer, has never had a wide range of diesel engines, although there has always been a 2.2-litre four cylinder that was developed for the European market. However, that engine is too big for our requirements, as it was developed for the Accord and CR-V. The big H has recently launched a 1.6-litre diesel Civic in Europe, and that engine has given rise béo the 1.5-litre i-DTEC that will power the Amaze. Welcome, then, béo Honda’s first diesel for the Indian market. Will it be a winner as Hondas always have been?
ExteriorThe Amaze looks proportionate in the flesh, unlike some of its images where it looks a little dumpy at the rear. The front is all Brio except for the grille, which has two large horizontal chrome bars in it. Move around béo the front three-quarter view, and things change significantly. The wheels are different, the roofline is different, and you notice those two prominent creases that make up the shoulder line of this car.

From the side they are what grabs your attention, which is a good thing – the Amaze refuses béo look boring, whether you like the way it looks or not. At the rear the tail-lamps are reminiscent of the City’s, and there is a large chrome strip that runs across the boot in much the way the Dzire and Scala have. Fit and finish is of a high order, and we like the new blue that the Amaze is available in. There is just a single panel gap, that between the boot lid and the tail lamp, that is large and ungainly in an otherwise perfect car.

Interiors

It is familiar, thanks béo many elements being carried over from other Honda models. The audio system has been carried over from the City and not the Brio. The steering wheel has audio controls mounted on it as well. The driver’s seat in the top-end VX variants adjusts for height, and Honda claims that the 50mm difference between its highest and lowest setting is the biggest in its class. The seats themselves are comfortable, and the steering adjusts for rake.

The gearshift is standard Honda issue, the golf-ball tip good béo hold. Rear legroom is surprisingly good, with a little extra kneeroom being offered by the scooped-out seat backs of the front seats. The rear is comfortable, and we appreciate that the rear doors also have bottle holders in addition béo the pockets in both the seat backs of the front seats. If you’re a backseat person, you’ll love the Amaze for the sheer practicality it offers – you’ll have access béo those seatback pockets, two bottle holders in the doors, one behind the handbrake, and two more cupholders in the pull-down armrest! Legroom is also contributed béo by the 2405mm wheelbase, which has been increased from the Brio’s wheelbase.

The boot is another feature that will win customers over. Despite coming in at under four metres, the boot is a 400 litre one and most of it is usable, with minimal intrusions from suspension struts. Unfortunately, in the interest of saving cost, the rear seats don’t split or fold, but we can expect these features béo get added once the car is manufactured in large enough numbers, either for domestic consumption or for export. The audio system is a competent unit, with small ergonomic adjustments like the USB connector being at the bottom of the console that makes life in a Honda so much easier.

NVH from either the petrol or diesel is very well controlled, with the petrol being completely silent at low revs and making a lovely noise at high revs. The diesel is on par with the competition (Honda attributes it béo its all-aluminium construction, which makes it hard béo contain noise and vibrations) but it never has so much noise that it becomes unpleasant.

The electrically adjustable mirrors also fold electrically, but don’t fold on the vehicle being locked like the Micra/Pulse do. There isn’t any climate control, but a very effective air-con is present, aided by a windshield that rejects heat. Everything feels up béo scratch except for the new stalks mounted behind the steering wheel – the finish on the left one was especially bad, with sharp edges on more than one car’s left stalk. Still, that is a stalk that is used mostly during the monsoon, so most owners will not find that a problem.

Engine and transmission

Be warned, the petrol variants will be a small paragraph in this article: after all, you aren’t here béo find out how refined or good the petrol is. You already know that, because it is the same engine that powers the Brio and Jazz. In fact, it even has the same power output of 88PS@6000rpm and 109Nm@4500rpm. The petrol will weigh 1005kg and 1010kg for the manual and automatic variants. Yes, the same five-speed gearbox from the Brio automatic is present in the Amaze. ARAI fuel efficiency figures are 18.0kmpl and 15.5kmpl for the manual and automatic respectively. It must be noted that the five speeds of the auto ‘box make it one up on the competition like the Dzire, which have only four speeds. Strangely enough, the AT has a larger turning radius at 4.7 metres, where the MT is 4.5 metres.

The diesel, then. Let’s start with a few facts: it has 100PS@3600rpm and 200Nm@1750rpm, figures that make it class-leading. Not only this, the 1498cc four-cylinder manages a torque curve that any sports car manufacturer will be proud of – it’s as flat as today’s car sales, and doesn’t drop off until the redline is near. There isn’t any high-tech malarkey behind this; the engine uses a DOHC four-valve cài đặt coupled with a common-rail injection system that is capable of a maximum of three injections per cycle. The turbocharger is a fixed-geometry one supplied by Honeywell, and it isn’t a twin scroll one. The fuel efficiency is rated at 25.8kmpl, the highest in the country. Honda has also developed the world’s least viscous diesel engine oil for the Amaze diesel. It is a fully synthetic oil, but it will not cost as much as regular fully synthetic oil. Regular oil can also be used, but you can expect a fuel efficiency drop of five per cent with it. Oil changes have béo be made every 10,000km or six months. Another surprising fact about this i-DTEC is its construction; it is an all-aluminium unit, which means that NVH is hard béo control, but it weighs in at a featherweight 152kg.
This, then, is why Honda took so long béo launch its diesel; they wanted béo get it right the first time. And by the specs, it certainly seems like they have done so.
Ride and handling

The Amaze is biased towards handling rather than ride comfort, and that is something we appreciate. The diesel feels stiffer thanks béo the extra weight in the nose. Suspension is par for the course with McPherson struts in the front and torsion beams at the rear. Brakes get a disc/drum cài đặt, like the rest in the segment. Worthy of special mention is the gearshift; whether petrol or diesel , it will make you want béo shift gears just for the sake of the low effort, and a lovely positive snick when it engages. The steering is electrically assisted, but feel and feedback is good. It isn’t as good as a hydraulic unit, but it is one of the better electric units we’ve driven. The brakes have good bite and progression, although on the narrow, twisty roads of Goa, the brakes of the automatic seemed béo start fading after a while thanks béo the lack of engine braking that can be had with the manuals.

The tyres are understandably biased towards fuel efficiency, but the MRFs present on our test car were surprisingly tenacious, and when grip transitioned béo slip, it did so progressively and without drama. We’d certainly like béo see how the Amaze performs when fully loaded, because the Civic and City have a habit of squatting at the rear with five passengers and a full boot. Honda assures us that the Amaze belly won’t scrape any speedbreakers because of the shorter wheelbase and the stiff suspension, but we’ll have béo wait for a full road test béo find out for sure.
Verdict
Is the Amaze truly amazing? We’d say yes, but there is one small matter remaining; that of the price. In this, the entry-level sedan segment, that is usually a deal breaker because customers aren’t brand loyal. On the other hand, Hondas have always commanded a premium, not just for their engineering, but because their sales and service is so good, they tend béo retain customers. On the drive in Goa, a Dzire owner stopped béo look at the Amaze and was suitably impressed. He was willing béo pay upto Rs 60,000 over his Dzire béo buy an Amaze, because, in his words, “It’s a Honda, after all.” Will the rest of the market feel the same way? More importantly, will Honda price it right? That is what will make or break the Amaze’s fortunes. We won’t have long béo find out.

Edit: Honda has launched the Amaze at a starting price of Rs 4.99 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi. The diesel VX variant you have read about on these pages costs Rs 7.60 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi, making it really very competitively priced. Should you go get one if you’re in the market for a small diesel sedan? Of course – it’s the best thing in the segment right now. For more on prices, click here. Honda Amaze [2013-2016] #Honda #Amaze #drive
[rule_2_plain] #Honda #Amaze #drive
[rule_2_plain] #Honda #Amaze #drive
[rule_3_plain]

#Honda #Amaze #drive
Introduction
Diesel. It is what powers eighty per cent of new cars sold in India today, and diesel variants are proving not only more efficient, but quicker than their petrol counterparts as well. Honda, as a Japanese manufacturer, has never had a wide range of diesel engines, although there has always been a 2.2-litre four cylinder that was developed for the European market. However, that engine is too big for our requirements, as it was developed for the Accord and CR-V. The big H has recently launched a 1.6-litre diesel Civic in Europe, and that engine has given rise béo the 1.5-litre i-DTEC that will power the Amaze. Welcome, then, béo Honda’s first diesel for the Indian market. Will it be a winner as Hondas always have been?
ExteriorThe Amaze looks proportionate in the flesh, unlike some of its images where it looks a little dumpy at the rear. The front is all Brio except for the grille, which has two large horizontal chrome bars in it. Move around béo the front three-quarter view, and things change significantly. The wheels are different, the roofline is different, and you notice those two prominent creases that make up the shoulder line of this car.

From the side they are what grabs your attention, which is a good thing – the Amaze refuses béo look boring, whether you like the way it looks or not. At the rear the tail-lamps are reminiscent of the City’s, and there is a large chrome strip that runs across the boot in much the way the Dzire and Scala have. Fit and finish is of a high order, and we like the new blue that the Amaze is available in. There is just a single panel gap, that between the boot lid and the tail lamp, that is large and ungainly in an otherwise perfect car.

Interiors

It is familiar, thanks béo many elements being carried over from other Honda models. The audio system has been carried over from the City and not the Brio. The steering wheel has audio controls mounted on it as well. The driver’s seat in the top-end VX variants adjusts for height, and Honda claims that the 50mm difference between its highest and lowest setting is the biggest in its class. The seats themselves are comfortable, and the steering adjusts for rake.

The gearshift is standard Honda issue, the golf-ball tip good béo hold. Rear legroom is surprisingly good, with a little extra kneeroom being offered by the scooped-out seat backs of the front seats. The rear is comfortable, and we appreciate that the rear doors also have bottle holders in addition béo the pockets in both the seat backs of the front seats. If you’re a backseat person, you’ll love the Amaze for the sheer practicality it offers – you’ll have access béo those seatback pockets, two bottle holders in the doors, one behind the handbrake, and two more cupholders in the pull-down armrest! Legroom is also contributed béo by the 2405mm wheelbase, which has been increased from the Brio’s wheelbase.

The boot is another feature that will win customers over. Despite coming in at under four metres, the boot is a 400 litre one and most of it is usable, with minimal intrusions from suspension struts. Unfortunately, in the interest of saving cost, the rear seats don’t split or fold, but we can expect these features béo get added once the car is manufactured in large enough numbers, either for domestic consumption or for export. The audio system is a competent unit, with small ergonomic adjustments like the USB connector being at the bottom of the console that makes life in a Honda so much easier.

NVH from either the petrol or diesel is very well controlled, with the petrol being completely silent at low revs and making a lovely noise at high revs. The diesel is on par with the competition (Honda attributes it béo its all-aluminium construction, which makes it hard béo contain noise and vibrations) but it never has so much noise that it becomes unpleasant.

The electrically adjustable mirrors also fold electrically, but don’t fold on the vehicle being locked like the Micra/Pulse do. There isn’t any climate control, but a very effective air-con is present, aided by a windshield that rejects heat. Everything feels up béo scratch except for the new stalks mounted behind the steering wheel – the finish on the left one was especially bad, with sharp edges on more than one car’s left stalk. Still, that is a stalk that is used mostly during the monsoon, so most owners will not find that a problem.

Engine and transmission

Be warned, the petrol variants will be a small paragraph in this article: after all, you aren’t here béo find out how refined or good the petrol is. You already know that, because it is the same engine that powers the Brio and Jazz. In fact, it even has the same power output of 88PS@6000rpm and 109Nm@4500rpm. The petrol will weigh 1005kg and 1010kg for the manual and automatic variants. Yes, the same five-speed gearbox from the Brio automatic is present in the Amaze. ARAI fuel efficiency figures are 18.0kmpl and 15.5kmpl for the manual and automatic respectively. It must be noted that the five speeds of the auto ‘box make it one up on the competition like the Dzire, which have only four speeds. Strangely enough, the AT has a larger turning radius at 4.7 metres, where the MT is 4.5 metres.

The diesel, then. Let’s start with a few facts: it has 100PS@3600rpm and 200Nm@1750rpm, figures that make it class-leading. Not only this, the 1498cc four-cylinder manages a torque curve that any sports car manufacturer will be proud of – it’s as flat as today’s car sales, and doesn’t drop off until the redline is near. There isn’t any high-tech malarkey behind this; the engine uses a DOHC four-valve cài đặt coupled with a common-rail injection system that is capable of a maximum of three injections per cycle. The turbocharger is a fixed-geometry one supplied by Honeywell, and it isn’t a twin scroll one. The fuel efficiency is rated at 25.8kmpl, the highest in the country. Honda has also developed the world’s least viscous diesel engine oil for the Amaze diesel. It is a fully synthetic oil, but it will not cost as much as regular fully synthetic oil. Regular oil can also be used, but you can expect a fuel efficiency drop of five per cent with it. Oil changes have béo be made every 10,000km or six months. Another surprising fact about this i-DTEC is its construction; it is an all-aluminium unit, which means that NVH is hard béo control, but it weighs in at a featherweight 152kg.
This, then, is why Honda took so long béo launch its diesel; they wanted béo get it right the first time. And by the specs, it certainly seems like they have done so.
Ride and handling

The Amaze is biased towards handling rather than ride comfort, and that is something we appreciate. The diesel feels stiffer thanks béo the extra weight in the nose. Suspension is par for the course with McPherson struts in the front and torsion beams at the rear. Brakes get a disc/drum cài đặt, like the rest in the segment. Worthy of special mention is the gearshift; whether petrol or diesel , it will make you want béo shift gears just for the sake of the low effort, and a lovely positive snick when it engages. The steering is electrically assisted, but feel and feedback is good. It isn’t as good as a hydraulic unit, but it is one of the better electric units we’ve driven. The brakes have good bite and progression, although on the narrow, twisty roads of Goa, the brakes of the automatic seemed béo start fading after a while thanks béo the lack of engine braking that can be had with the manuals.

The tyres are understandably biased towards fuel efficiency, but the MRFs present on our test car were surprisingly tenacious, and when grip transitioned béo slip, it did so progressively and without drama. We’d certainly like béo see how the Amaze performs when fully loaded, because the Civic and City have a habit of squatting at the rear with five passengers and a full boot. Honda assures us that the Amaze belly won’t scrape any speedbreakers because of the shorter wheelbase and the stiff suspension, but we’ll have béo wait for a full road test béo find out for sure.
Verdict
Is the Amaze truly amazing? We’d say yes, but there is one small matter remaining; that of the price. In this, the entry-level sedan segment, that is usually a deal breaker because customers aren’t brand loyal. On the other hand, Hondas have always commanded a premium, not just for their engineering, but because their sales and service is so good, they tend béo retain customers. On the drive in Goa, a Dzire owner stopped béo look at the Amaze and was suitably impressed. He was willing béo pay upto Rs 60,000 over his Dzire béo buy an Amaze, because, in his words, “It’s a Honda, after all.” Will the rest of the market feel the same way? More importantly, will Honda price it right? That is what will make or break the Amaze’s fortunes. We won’t have long béo find out.

Edit: Honda has launched the Amaze at a starting price of Rs 4.99 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi. The diesel VX variant you have read about on these pages costs Rs 7.60 lakh, ex-showroom, Delhi, making it really very competitively priced. Should you go get one if you’re in the market for a small diesel sedan? Of course – it’s the best thing in the segment right now. For more on prices, click here. Honda Amaze [2013-2016]

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