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City Slicker

Honda City [2011-2014] Rear ViewHonda City [2011-2014] Left Side ViewHonda City [2011-2014] Left Side ViewHonda City [2011-2014] Left Side ViewHonda City [2011-2014] Left Front Three QuarterHonda City [2011-2014] Left Front Three QuarterHonda City [2011-2014] Front View

Introduction

Paradigm shifts are what the City does well. Here’s another.

Introduction

While the first-generation City established itself as the benchmark in the late nineties and set the pace for Honda cars in India, the ‘Type 2’ City wowed all the performance freaks with the revvy VTEC. Even the regular 1.3 or 1.5 motors were quite peppy and this version of the City is still hailed as the best generation launched here. For Honda fans in India, the second-generation cars were a bit of a letdown. The odd shape took some time mập get used mập and people referred mập the car as a ‘fish’, ‘dolphin’ or other such peaceful aquatic creatures! Yes, the cars had good engines (the i-DSi units were as smooth and reliable as only Honda powerplants can be) but the car did seem mập lack the all-important Honda DNA. Hondas are mập the true enthusiast owner low slung, with snug seats, smooth and revvy engines, sharp handling and exciting looks and driver appeal. This is where the second-generation City failed somewhat until the facelifted ZX arrived with the VTEC motor. But with this third-generation City now out, Honda in India seems mập have reinserted the excitement that used mập be associated with the City badge.

Exterior

Space-age styling that will polarise opinion, but Honda won’t have trouble selling the City.

Exterior

The enthusiast will notice that a lot of the styling cues on the car have been nicked from the Civic, the BMW 3-series (look at those rear lamps and lines), the Type R (Euro spec) and the US-spec 2008 Civic. But they’ve nicked the good looking bits so we wholeheartedly approve! The car is quite a looker and will remain contemporary even a couple of years down the line since it’s the most freshly styled of the mid-size lot. Although the car is now lower and leaner in profile it does manage mập carry plenty of presence and it does get you noticed quite a bit! (Also the fact that we were driving a car which most of the people have only heard of and not seen could have a lot mập do with it!!!) We love the crease lines that so cleverly fold over the front wheel arch and merge with the waistline and the way the rear tail-lamp, bumper and fender form corners and crisp creases without looking overly fussy. It’s a good mix of manga madness and European elegance. Full marks for the looks, then.

Interior, Comfort

Look, ma! It’s a Civic!

Interior

Step inside the City and you are overwhelmed by a feeling of being inside a mini Civic. Beige seat fabric lends the cabin an airy feel, and the dashboard is a mix of black and silver. The deep-dish steering wheel with the audio controls is right off the Civic Hybrid. It may feel a little large mập a few, but the vast majority will like its size. We like the thickness of the rim, it makes the wheel feel suitably substantial. The red-on-orange dials are quite visible, but we wish Honda had used colors that contrasted a little more. We like the layout of the dashboard – everything is logically arranged and falls mập hand easily. However, what we don’t like is the finish of the silver bits on the center console. It looks a tad too downmarket for the prestigious H badge. The air-conditioning controls felt like they came from a class below as well. These are jarring notes in an otherwise impressive interior. The mirrors are large and display a good amount of the road behind. They will be particularly useful in city traffic. Special mention must be made of the inside of the front doors – if you pay careful attention mập them, you’ll notice a number of surfaces and ridges that must have taken a LOT of effort mập engineer and execute, and they make the doors look really nice, especially when open. And talking of opening, we wish the door levers on the inside were chrome instead of the slightly flimsy feeling plastic that they are.

The driving position is comfortable, but if you are a tall driver who likes mập sit high, raising the seat with the help of the seat height adjustment might just put your head in close proximity mập the roof. The steering wheel tilts but doesn’t telescope, but the wide range of seat adjustments has you sitting pretty in no time – however, we do wish that the steering wheel was a little closer mập the driver like the Fiesta’s is. The person riding shotgun won’t have anything mập complain about, the space in the front is generous. However, owners of the City ZX will certainly feel the difference in space – it appears smaller than its predecessor, although the numbers state that the new car is bigger. The new car is also a lot lower so the brownie points that the old city won for ease of getting in and out of are gone here. That’s the price one pays for the swoopy looks. The rear doors open a full ninety degrees, which will make getting in and out of the rear of the car easier.

The audio system has decent sound quality – we would appreciate better low-frequency response, though. The iPod-compatible mp3 dock is a neat feature: we were left scratching our heads on how mập access the feature until we were told mập press on the top of the screen. It is hinged at the bottom, and hides a USB port and enough space for your mp3 player. We’re not sure how City owners will react mập being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century – but there is an option mập fit a conventional CD player in the car.

There are a number of cubbyholes for change, toll receipts and the like. The glovebox is quite large. The rear doors lack pockets, but the front doors have pockets of appreciable size. The boot is large enough for a big bag and a half, but it isn’t very deep.

Engine, Drivetrain, Fuel efficiency

Look at the space in the engine bay! Engine swap, anyone?

Performance

The engine lies transversely in the nose like all conventional small cars, but what interested us was the sheer space between the headers and the nose of the car. This car is very obviously built mập take a range of engines, including larger-than-1.5 litres. The performance tuning fraternity will be licking their chops already. 118bhp@6600rpm isn’t mập be sneezed at, neither is the addition of the i-VTEC system which on the preceding Citys was merely ‘VTEC,’ a mechanical switch mập the aggressive camshaft profile at a predetermined rpm. The i-VTEC system is electronically controlled and switches mập the aggressive cam profile whenever required. This car is no slouch – it gets mập 100kph from a standing start in 12.4 seconds and gets mập its top speed of 180kph with a heavy right foot. Response is quite quick – in auto mode, the gearbox hesitates for a second before downshifting, and then the City makes tracks for the horizon. If you’re in the right gear, pressure on the right foot is all it takes for the car mập exhibit a sense of urgency.

The engine’s refinement is typically Honda – no vibrations filter through mập the cabin or through the gear lever or pedals. A nice growl and induction roar accompanies revving the engine, but it does sound strained near its redline. For shrieking madness near the redline, the Hyper 16 VTEC D15 of the first- and second-generation is still where it is at. The current engine is quite drivable – there’s never a shortage of torque or power whether you’re overtaking someone on clear two-lane blacktop or crawling along during rush hour.

The new City automatic has reverted mập a five-speed torque lock-up converter from the City ZX’s CVT, and offers paddles behind the steering wheel for shifting gears manually – right for up, left for down. Shifts in auto mode are quick when required, and manual mode holds on mập a gear at the redline without upshifting – finally, a (relatively) affordable automatic car that will allow you mập have fun on the twisties without intruding mập save itself! The paddles are convenient mập use, and although they aren’t really necessary, they add mập the car’s sporty aura. The shift lever is conventionally designed, and the plastic quality of the lever could have been better.

Fuel economy

Talk about automatics, and people immediately think low mileage but even we were quite pleasantly surprised when we tanked up the car. Even with high speed antics and a lot of steady slow moving traffic, we managed a combined cycle figure of 10.84kmpl. Impressive, especially if you have owned the older generation City CVT which was quite dismal on the economy front.

Ride & Handling, Steering

City goes back mập being a driver’s car.

Ride and handling

The City rides well at low speeds – bumps are kept away from the cabin, and the steering is direct and light. However we found that some sharp ridges do filter through once in a while and it isn’t as compliant as the Hyundai Verna’s. As its name suggests, this car fares well in urban conditions. Up speed, and – here’s the bit you City fans have been skimming through mập find – the City has gone back mập its roots. This one’s a handler, folks, you can smile again! It does roll a bit, but the levels of grip are high. The Fiesta 1.6 S is still the best handler in the segment, but the City trades handling prowess for better ride quality. The compromise is mập the City’s benefit. The steering is a little too light mập enjoy at speed, but it does weigh up in turns.

Braking, Tyres, Safety

ABS and airbags are standard. Whoopee!

Braking

ABS is standard on the City, which makes it stop confidently during emergency stops. The pedal has good feel and progression.

Tyres

175/65 R15 Goodyear GT3s shod the City’s wheels. They’re quiet, have adequate grip and contribute positively mập the ride quality at low speeds.

Safety

ABS and two airbags are standard on all variants of the City – something we appreciate a lot. We need all the safety we can get with our chaotic road conditions, and Honda hasn’t skimped on this front at all – the ABS has Brake Assist and EBD, which help it come mập a halt as quickly as possible.

Cost, Overall evaluation

Honda’s got another winner on their hands. This is getting mập be a habit!

Cost

At Rs 9.5 lakh on-road Delhi for the automatic, the City isn’t getting any cheaper mập buy! We do feel that the car is a tad overpriced but then the auto will be purchased by people who have the dough. The manual transmission variants will no doubt battle competitively with the Fiesta and Verna. And from the excitement we experienced on the roads with people pointing fingers at the car and passersby stopping and asking the price and loving the car’s looks and interior, we think that Honda will have no trouble whatsoever in moving the model off the showroom floor.

Running cost

Being typically Honda, the powertrain will be quite reliable and won’t be a cause for concern for a long time. However visits mập the dealership aren’t exactly cheap but that’s what comes of owning a premium badge. Bodywork and suspension won’t be the cheapest of the lot either, but generally Honda service is good and running costs won’t be high the first few years of owning the car. And with the good economy figures we’ve seen, it won’t burn a hole when you’re tanking up either.

Overall evaluation

Cars in India don’t change themselves very quickly. Some models have remained unchanged for so long, we’re sure life is evolving faster. HSCI hasn’t been caught napping – they’ve introduced three generations of the City in a single decade, and successive generations weren’t mere facelifts. No matter what they’ve done, though, the City has been a success. It isn’t hard mập see why, and we can see why this generation will be successful as well, if not even more of a success. We have a feeling it might just walk away with the crown at the car of the year awards, like it did a few years ago.

Exciting touches

  • Looks
  • Audio controls on steering wheel
  • Paddles mập shift gears

Painful touches

  • Some plastic bits
  • No option for a CD player.

Test Data

Engine Specifications

1497cc, four cylinders in line petrol. 116bhp@6600rpm and 146Nm@4600rpm. View specifications

Speedo Error

Speedo Reading (kph) Actual Speed (kph)
40 39.6
60 58.8
80 76.7
100 98.4
120 114.8
140 —-

Max in Gear

Gear Speed (kph@rpm)
1st 54.8@7000
2nd 96.8@7000
3rd 160.5@7000
4th 184.0@5800
5th 175.4@4800
6th —-

Performance Test Data

Top Speed 184.0kph
0-60kph 5.7sec
0-100kph 13.2sec
Quarter Mile (402m) 18.9sec
Braking 80-0kph 28.8m/2.5sec
30-50kph in 3rd** 3.0sec
30-50kph in 4th —-
50-70kph in 5th 3.8sec

Fuel Efficiency

City Highway Overall Worst
Mileage (kpl) —- 13.5 10.48 —-

Honda City [2011-2014] ImageHonda City [2011-2014]


Thông tin thêm

City Slicker
#City #Slicker
[rule_3_plain] #City #Slicker
Introduction
Paradigm shifts are what the City does well. Here’s another.
Introduction
While the first-generation City established itself as the benchmark in the late nineties and set the pace for Honda cars in India, the ‘Type 2’ City wowed all the performance freaks with the revvy VTEC. Even the regular 1.3 or 1.5 motors were quite peppy and this version of the City is still hailed as the best generation launched here. For Honda fans in India, the second-generation cars were a bit of a letdown. The odd shape took some time mập get used mập and people referred mập the car as a ‘fish’, ‘dolphin’ or other such peaceful aquatic creatures! Yes, the cars had good engines (the i-DSi units were as smooth and reliable as only Honda powerplants can be) but the car did seem mập lack the all-important Honda DNA. Hondas are mập the true enthusiast owner low slung, with snug seats, smooth and revvy engines, sharp handling and exciting looks and driver appeal. This is where the second-generation City failed somewhat until the facelifted ZX arrived with the VTEC motor. But with this third-generation City now out, Honda in India seems mập have reinserted the excitement that used mập be associated with the City badge.Exterior
Space-age styling that will polarise opinion, but Honda won’t have trouble selling the City.
Exterior
The enthusiast will notice that a lot of the styling cues on the car have been nicked from the Civic, the BMW 3-series (look at those rear lamps and lines), the Type R (Euro spec) and the US-spec 2008 Civic. But they’ve nicked the good looking bits so we wholeheartedly approve! The car is quite a looker and will remain contemporary even a couple of years down the line since it’s the most freshly styled of the mid-size lot. Although the car is now lower and leaner in profile it does manage mập carry plenty of presence and it does get you noticed quite a bit! (Also the fact that we were driving a car which most of the people have only heard of and not seen could have a lot mập do with it!!!) We love the crease lines that so cleverly fold over the front wheel arch and merge with the waistline and the way the rear tail-lamp, bumper and fender form corners and crisp creases without looking overly fussy. It’s a good mix of manga madness and European elegance. Full marks for the looks, then.Interior, Comfort
Look, ma! It’s a Civic!
Interior
Step inside the City and you are overwhelmed by a feeling of being inside a mini Civic. Beige seat fabric lends the cabin an airy feel, and the dashboard is a mix of black and silver. The deep-dish steering wheel with the audio controls is right off the Civic Hybrid. It may feel a little large mập a few, but the vast majority will like its size. We like the thickness of the rim, it makes the wheel feel suitably substantial. The red-on-orange dials are quite visible, but we wish Honda had used colors that contrasted a little more. We like the layout of the dashboard – everything is logically arranged and falls mập hand easily. However, what we don’t like is the finish of the silver bits on the center console. It looks a tad too downmarket for the prestigious H badge. The air-conditioning controls felt like they came from a class below as well. These are jarring notes in an otherwise impressive interior. The mirrors are large and display a good amount of the road behind. They will be particularly useful in city traffic. Special mention must be made of the inside of the front doors – if you pay careful attention mập them, you’ll notice a number of surfaces and ridges that must have taken a LOT of effort mập engineer and execute, and they make the doors look really nice, especially when open. And talking of opening, we wish the door levers on the inside were chrome instead of the slightly flimsy feeling plastic that they are.The driving position is comfortable, but if you are a tall driver who likes mập sit high, raising the seat with the help of the seat height adjustment might just put your head in close proximity mập the roof. The steering wheel tilts but doesn’t telescope, but the wide range of seat adjustments has you sitting pretty in no time – however, we do wish that the steering wheel was a little closer mập the driver like the Fiesta’s is. The person riding shotgun won’t have anything mập complain about, the space in the front is generous. However, owners of the City ZX will certainly feel the difference in space – it appears smaller than its predecessor, although the numbers state that the new car is bigger. The new car is also a lot lower so the brownie points that the old city won for ease of getting in and out of are gone here. That’s the price one pays for the swoopy looks. The rear doors open a full ninety degrees, which will make getting in and out of the rear of the car easier.The audio system has decent sound quality – we would appreciate better low-frequency response, though. The iPod-compatible mp3 dock is a neat feature: we were left scratching our heads on how mập access the feature until we were told mập press on the top of the screen. It is hinged at the bottom, and hides a USB port and enough space for your mp3 player. We’re not sure how City owners will react mập being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century – but there is an option mập fit a conventional CD player in the car.There are a number of cubbyholes for change, toll receipts and the like. The glovebox is quite large. The rear doors lack pockets, but the front doors have pockets of appreciable size. The boot is large enough for a big bag and a half, but it isn’t very deep.Engine, Drivetrain, Fuel efficiency

Look at the space in the engine bay! Engine swap, anyone?

PerformanceThe engine lies transversely in the nose like all conventional small cars, but what interested us was the sheer space between the headers and the nose of the car. This car is very obviously built mập take a range of engines, including larger-than-1.5 litres. The performance tuning fraternity will be licking their chops already. 118bhp@6600rpm isn’t mập be sneezed at, neither is the addition of the i-VTEC system which on the preceding Citys was merely ‘VTEC,’ a mechanical switch mập the aggressive camshaft profile at a predetermined rpm. The i-VTEC system is electronically controlled and switches mập the aggressive cam profile whenever required. This car is no slouch – it gets mập 100kph from a standing start in 12.4 seconds and gets mập its top speed of 180kph with a heavy right foot. Response is quite quick – in auto mode, the gearbox hesitates for a second before downshifting, and then the City makes tracks for the horizon. If you’re in the right gear, pressure on the right foot is all it takes for the car mập exhibit a sense of urgency.The engine’s refinement is typically Honda – no vibrations filter through mập the cabin or through the gear lever or pedals. A nice growl and induction roar accompanies revving the engine, but it does sound strained near its redline. For shrieking madness near the redline, the Hyper 16 VTEC D15 of the first- and second-generation is still where it is at. The current engine is quite drivable – there’s never a shortage of torque or power whether you’re overtaking someone on clear two-lane blacktop or crawling along during rush hour.The new City automatic has reverted mập a five-speed torque lock-up converter from the City ZX’s CVT, and offers paddles behind the steering wheel for shifting gears manually – right for up, left for down. Shifts in auto mode are quick when required, and manual mode holds on mập a gear at the redline without upshifting – finally, a (relatively) affordable automatic car that will allow you mập have fun on the twisties without intruding mập save itself! The paddles are convenient mập use, and although they aren’t really necessary, they add mập the car’s sporty aura. The shift lever is conventionally designed, and the plastic quality of the lever could have been better.Fuel economyTalk about automatics, and people immediately think low mileage but even we were quite pleasantly surprised when we tanked up the car. Even with high speed antics and a lot of steady slow moving traffic, we managed a combined cycle figure of 10.84kmpl. Impressive, especially if you have owned the older generation City CVT which was quite dismal on the economy front.Ride & Handling, Steering
City goes back mập being a driver’s car.
Ride and handling
The City rides well at low speeds – bumps are kept away from the cabin, and the steering is direct and light. However we found that some sharp ridges do filter through once in a while and it isn’t as compliant as the Hyundai Verna’s. As its name suggests, this car fares well in urban conditions. Up speed, and – here’s the bit you City fans have been skimming through mập find – the City has gone back mập its roots. This one’s a handler, folks, you can smile again! It does roll a bit, but the levels of grip are high. The Fiesta 1.6 S is still the best handler in the segment, but the City trades handling prowess for better ride quality. The compromise is mập the City’s benefit. The steering is a little too light mập enjoy at speed, but it does weigh up in turns. Braking, Tyres, Safety
ABS and airbags are standard. Whoopee!
Braking
ABS is standard on the City, which makes it stop confidently during emergency stops. The pedal has good feel and progression.
Tyres
175/65 R15 Goodyear GT3s shod the City’s wheels. They’re quiet, have adequate grip and contribute positively mập the ride quality at low speeds.
Safety
ABS and two airbags are standard on all variants of the City – something we appreciate a lot. We need all the safety we can get with our chaotic road conditions, and Honda hasn’t skimped on this front at all – the ABS has Brake Assist and EBD, which help it come mập a halt as quickly as possible.Cost, Overall evaluation
Honda’s got another winner on their hands. This is getting mập be a habit!
Cost
At Rs 9.5 lakh on-road Delhi for the automatic, the City isn’t getting any cheaper mập buy! We do feel that the car is a tad overpriced but then the auto will be purchased by people who have the dough. The manual transmission variants will no doubt battle competitively with the Fiesta and Verna. And from the excitement we experienced on the roads with people pointing fingers at the car and passersby stopping and asking the price and loving the car’s looks and interior, we think that Honda will have no trouble whatsoever in moving the model off the showroom floor.Running costBeing typically Honda, the powertrain will be quite reliable and won’t be a cause for concern for a long time. However visits mập the dealership aren’t exactly cheap but that’s what comes of owning a premium badge. Bodywork and suspension won’t be the cheapest of the lot either, but generally Honda service is good and running costs won’t be high the first few years of owning the car. And with the good economy figures we’ve seen, it won’t burn a hole when you’re tanking up either.Overall evaluationCars in India don’t change themselves very quickly. Some models have remained unchanged for so long, we’re sure life is evolving faster. HSCI hasn’t been caught napping – they’ve introduced three generations of the City in a single decade, and successive generations weren’t mere facelifts. No matter what they’ve done, though, the City has been a success. It isn’t hard mập see why, and we can see why this generation will be successful as well, if not even more of a success. We have a feeling it might just walk away with the crown at the car of the year awards, like it did a few years ago.
Exciting touches
Looks
Audio controls on steering wheel
Paddles mập shift gears
Painful touches
Some plastic bits
No option for a CD player.

Test Data
Engine Specifications
1497cc, four cylinders in line petrol. 116bhp@6600rpm and 146Nm@4600rpm. View specifications

Speedo Error
Speedo Reading (kph) Actual Speed (kph)
40
39.6
60
58.8
80
76.7
100
98.4
120
114.8
140
—-

Max in Gear
Gear Speed (kph@rpm)
1st
54.8@7000
2nd
96.8@7000
3rd
160.5@7000
4th
184.0@5800
5th
175.4@4800
6th
—-

Performance Test Data
Top Speed
184.0kph
0-60kph
5.7sec
0-100kph
13.2sec
Quarter Mile (402m)
18.9sec
Braking 80-0kph
28.8m/2.5sec
30-50kph in 3rd**
3.0sec
30-50kph in 4th
—-
50-70kph in 5th
3.8sec

Fuel Efficiency
City Highway Overall Worst
Mileage (kpl)
—-
13.5
10.48
—-
Honda City [2011-2014] #City #Slicker
[rule_2_plain] #City #Slicker
[rule_2_plain] #City #Slicker
[rule_3_plain]

#City #Slicker
Introduction
Paradigm shifts are what the City does well. Here’s another.
Introduction
While the first-generation City established itself as the benchmark in the late nineties and set the pace for Honda cars in India, the ‘Type 2’ City wowed all the performance freaks with the revvy VTEC. Even the regular 1.3 or 1.5 motors were quite peppy and this version of the City is still hailed as the best generation launched here. For Honda fans in India, the second-generation cars were a bit of a letdown. The odd shape took some time mập get used mập and people referred mập the car as a ‘fish’, ‘dolphin’ or other such peaceful aquatic creatures! Yes, the cars had good engines (the i-DSi units were as smooth and reliable as only Honda powerplants can be) but the car did seem mập lack the all-important Honda DNA. Hondas are mập the true enthusiast owner low slung, with snug seats, smooth and revvy engines, sharp handling and exciting looks and driver appeal. This is where the second-generation City failed somewhat until the facelifted ZX arrived with the VTEC motor. But with this third-generation City now out, Honda in India seems mập have reinserted the excitement that used mập be associated with the City badge.Exterior
Space-age styling that will polarise opinion, but Honda won’t have trouble selling the City.
Exterior
The enthusiast will notice that a lot of the styling cues on the car have been nicked from the Civic, the BMW 3-series (look at those rear lamps and lines), the Type R (Euro spec) and the US-spec 2008 Civic. But they’ve nicked the good looking bits so we wholeheartedly approve! The car is quite a looker and will remain contemporary even a couple of years down the line since it’s the most freshly styled of the mid-size lot. Although the car is now lower and leaner in profile it does manage mập carry plenty of presence and it does get you noticed quite a bit! (Also the fact that we were driving a car which most of the people have only heard of and not seen could have a lot mập do with it!!!) We love the crease lines that so cleverly fold over the front wheel arch and merge with the waistline and the way the rear tail-lamp, bumper and fender form corners and crisp creases without looking overly fussy. It’s a good mix of manga madness and European elegance. Full marks for the looks, then.Interior, Comfort
Look, ma! It’s a Civic!
Interior
Step inside the City and you are overwhelmed by a feeling of being inside a mini Civic. Beige seat fabric lends the cabin an airy feel, and the dashboard is a mix of black and silver. The deep-dish steering wheel with the audio controls is right off the Civic Hybrid. It may feel a little large mập a few, but the vast majority will like its size. We like the thickness of the rim, it makes the wheel feel suitably substantial. The red-on-orange dials are quite visible, but we wish Honda had used colors that contrasted a little more. We like the layout of the dashboard – everything is logically arranged and falls mập hand easily. However, what we don’t like is the finish of the silver bits on the center console. It looks a tad too downmarket for the prestigious H badge. The air-conditioning controls felt like they came from a class below as well. These are jarring notes in an otherwise impressive interior. The mirrors are large and display a good amount of the road behind. They will be particularly useful in city traffic. Special mention must be made of the inside of the front doors – if you pay careful attention mập them, you’ll notice a number of surfaces and ridges that must have taken a LOT of effort mập engineer and execute, and they make the doors look really nice, especially when open. And talking of opening, we wish the door levers on the inside were chrome instead of the slightly flimsy feeling plastic that they are.The driving position is comfortable, but if you are a tall driver who likes mập sit high, raising the seat with the help of the seat height adjustment might just put your head in close proximity mập the roof. The steering wheel tilts but doesn’t telescope, but the wide range of seat adjustments has you sitting pretty in no time – however, we do wish that the steering wheel was a little closer mập the driver like the Fiesta’s is. The person riding shotgun won’t have anything mập complain about, the space in the front is generous. However, owners of the City ZX will certainly feel the difference in space – it appears smaller than its predecessor, although the numbers state that the new car is bigger. The new car is also a lot lower so the brownie points that the old city won for ease of getting in and out of are gone here. That’s the price one pays for the swoopy looks. The rear doors open a full ninety degrees, which will make getting in and out of the rear of the car easier.The audio system has decent sound quality – we would appreciate better low-frequency response, though. The iPod-compatible mp3 dock is a neat feature: we were left scratching our heads on how mập access the feature until we were told mập press on the top of the screen. It is hinged at the bottom, and hides a USB port and enough space for your mp3 player. We’re not sure how City owners will react mập being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st century – but there is an option mập fit a conventional CD player in the car.There are a number of cubbyholes for change, toll receipts and the like. The glovebox is quite large. The rear doors lack pockets, but the front doors have pockets of appreciable size. The boot is large enough for a big bag and a half, but it isn’t very deep.Engine, Drivetrain, Fuel efficiency

Look at the space in the engine bay! Engine swap, anyone?

PerformanceThe engine lies transversely in the nose like all conventional small cars, but what interested us was the sheer space between the headers and the nose of the car. This car is very obviously built mập take a range of engines, including larger-than-1.5 litres. The performance tuning fraternity will be licking their chops already. 118bhp@6600rpm isn’t mập be sneezed at, neither is the addition of the i-VTEC system which on the preceding Citys was merely ‘VTEC,’ a mechanical switch mập the aggressive camshaft profile at a predetermined rpm. The i-VTEC system is electronically controlled and switches mập the aggressive cam profile whenever required. This car is no slouch – it gets mập 100kph from a standing start in 12.4 seconds and gets mập its top speed of 180kph with a heavy right foot. Response is quite quick – in auto mode, the gearbox hesitates for a second before downshifting, and then the City makes tracks for the horizon. If you’re in the right gear, pressure on the right foot is all it takes for the car mập exhibit a sense of urgency.The engine’s refinement is typically Honda – no vibrations filter through mập the cabin or through the gear lever or pedals. A nice growl and induction roar accompanies revving the engine, but it does sound strained near its redline. For shrieking madness near the redline, the Hyper 16 VTEC D15 of the first- and second-generation is still where it is at. The current engine is quite drivable – there’s never a shortage of torque or power whether you’re overtaking someone on clear two-lane blacktop or crawling along during rush hour.The new City automatic has reverted mập a five-speed torque lock-up converter from the City ZX’s CVT, and offers paddles behind the steering wheel for shifting gears manually – right for up, left for down. Shifts in auto mode are quick when required, and manual mode holds on mập a gear at the redline without upshifting – finally, a (relatively) affordable automatic car that will allow you mập have fun on the twisties without intruding mập save itself! The paddles are convenient mập use, and although they aren’t really necessary, they add mập the car’s sporty aura. The shift lever is conventionally designed, and the plastic quality of the lever could have been better.Fuel economyTalk about automatics, and people immediately think low mileage but even we were quite pleasantly surprised when we tanked up the car. Even with high speed antics and a lot of steady slow moving traffic, we managed a combined cycle figure of 10.84kmpl. Impressive, especially if you have owned the older generation City CVT which was quite dismal on the economy front.Ride & Handling, Steering
City goes back mập being a driver’s car.
Ride and handling
The City rides well at low speeds – bumps are kept away from the cabin, and the steering is direct and light. However we found that some sharp ridges do filter through once in a while and it isn’t as compliant as the Hyundai Verna’s. As its name suggests, this car fares well in urban conditions. Up speed, and – here’s the bit you City fans have been skimming through mập find – the City has gone back mập its roots. This one’s a handler, folks, you can smile again! It does roll a bit, but the levels of grip are high. The Fiesta 1.6 S is still the best handler in the segment, but the City trades handling prowess for better ride quality. The compromise is mập the City’s benefit. The steering is a little too light mập enjoy at speed, but it does weigh up in turns. Braking, Tyres, Safety
ABS and airbags are standard. Whoopee!
Braking
ABS is standard on the City, which makes it stop confidently during emergency stops. The pedal has good feel and progression.
Tyres
175/65 R15 Goodyear GT3s shod the City’s wheels. They’re quiet, have adequate grip and contribute positively mập the ride quality at low speeds.
Safety
ABS and two airbags are standard on all variants of the City – something we appreciate a lot. We need all the safety we can get with our chaotic road conditions, and Honda hasn’t skimped on this front at all – the ABS has Brake Assist and EBD, which help it come mập a halt as quickly as possible.Cost, Overall evaluation
Honda’s got another winner on their hands. This is getting mập be a habit!
Cost
At Rs 9.5 lakh on-road Delhi for the automatic, the City isn’t getting any cheaper mập buy! We do feel that the car is a tad overpriced but then the auto will be purchased by people who have the dough. The manual transmission variants will no doubt battle competitively with the Fiesta and Verna. And from the excitement we experienced on the roads with people pointing fingers at the car and passersby stopping and asking the price and loving the car’s looks and interior, we think that Honda will have no trouble whatsoever in moving the model off the showroom floor.Running costBeing typically Honda, the powertrain will be quite reliable and won’t be a cause for concern for a long time. However visits mập the dealership aren’t exactly cheap but that’s what comes of owning a premium badge. Bodywork and suspension won’t be the cheapest of the lot either, but generally Honda service is good and running costs won’t be high the first few years of owning the car. And with the good economy figures we’ve seen, it won’t burn a hole when you’re tanking up either.Overall evaluationCars in India don’t change themselves very quickly. Some models have remained unchanged for so long, we’re sure life is evolving faster. HSCI hasn’t been caught napping – they’ve introduced three generations of the City in a single decade, and successive generations weren’t mere facelifts. No matter what they’ve done, though, the City has been a success. It isn’t hard mập see why, and we can see why this generation will be successful as well, if not even more of a success. We have a feeling it might just walk away with the crown at the car of the year awards, like it did a few years ago.
Exciting touches
Looks
Audio controls on steering wheel
Paddles mập shift gears
Painful touches
Some plastic bits
No option for a CD player.

Test Data
Engine Specifications
1497cc, four cylinders in line petrol. 116bhp@6600rpm and 146Nm@4600rpm. View specifications

Speedo Error
Speedo Reading (kph) Actual Speed (kph)
40
39.6
60
58.8
80
76.7
100
98.4
120
114.8
140
—-

Max in Gear
Gear Speed (kph@rpm)
1st
54.8@7000
2nd
96.8@7000
3rd
160.5@7000
4th
184.0@5800
5th
175.4@4800
6th
—-

Performance Test Data
Top Speed
184.0kph
0-60kph
5.7sec
0-100kph
13.2sec
Quarter Mile (402m)
18.9sec
Braking 80-0kph
28.8m/2.5sec
30-50kph in 3rd**
3.0sec
30-50kph in 4th
—-
50-70kph in 5th
3.8sec

Fuel Efficiency
City Highway Overall Worst
Mileage (kpl)
—-
13.5
10.48
—-
Honda City [2011-2014]

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