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2015 Volkswagen Vento

Volkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] inlandVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] ControlVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] ControlVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] ControlVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] inlandVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] inlandVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] inland

Introduce

Earlier this year, our resident German car fan, Venkat, spent some time with the refreshed Volkswagen Vento. And while VW has impressed him with its quick-shifting and good-quality 7-speed DSG at every lap, it’s not immune béo the fact that it has some serious competition in the C-segment sedan market. is vibrant.

There are simply too many strong products in the C-segment (Read: Honda City, Hyundai Verna, Maruti Ciaz) making it difficult for Vento béo find buyers. Aside from its company brother, the Skoda Rapid, the only cars that VW sells well are the Nissan Sunny and the Fiat Linea.

Is Volkswagen really greedy when it can’t sell a product as good as the Vento in bulk? Or has the market simply forgotten about it? Regardless of the circumstances, it is clear that Volkswagen will work hard béo make the Vento a better product than before. How else would one explain the arrival of this 2015 model in just seven months of the refreshed Vento launch?

Exterior

If Hyundai is this trendy co-worker who likes béo announce his entry in a classroom, then Volkswagen is probably the quiet kid who leaves a lasting impression while keeping things low. So all VWs are designed béo be discreet, and the 2015 Vento is no different.

Outside, not much has changed in the layout of the body panels. The 2015 Vento continues béo show Volkswagen’s distinctive design lines with a neatly designed front end, tight shoulder lines and compact body. However, Volkswagen did not leave the exterior intact.

There are some pretty subtle updates in the design that help deftly set the 2015 model apart from before. For example, the redesigned bonnet with deeper creases and a new front grille with three chrome slats accentuate the 2015 look. There’s also a new front air intake and fog lights. The front has integrated lights when cornering. Move béo the rear and you’ll notice the old layout of the taillights although revised inside, a thin chrome strip on the trunk lid and a redesigned rear bumper with chrome inserts and reflectors.

So how big of an impact will these subtle modifications have in raising Vento’s street credibility? Pretty big, if you ask me.

Given that mid-life changes aren’t always good news and that upgraded models often look worse than the cars they replace; Volkswagen has done a great job rejuvenating the Vento for 2015. Like older cars, what works in favor of the Vento is the well-balanced nature of the design. Right from the sharp lines around béo the neatly integrated trunk, the Vento looks very well proportioned and not just a boot brother of the Polo.

inland

Inside, the cabin boasts a good mix of quality materials and comfortable seating for up béo five people. While the interior design remains the same, Volkswagen has introduced new color themes and updated the equipment list according béo trim levels.

If I compare it béo a Hyundai Verna or a Fiat Linea, the Vento’s cabin looks a bit dull, but in terms of quality and fit and plastic finishing the VW can hardly match. With the exception of some hard plastic, all controls work with tension and precision and even the new ‘Walnut Desert Beige’ color theme, as seen in our test car , is also well-finished. Adding appeal béo the cabin is the overall comfort màn chơi. While both the front and rear seats are comfortable, the rear lacks legroom, and unless Volkswagen decides béo make drastic changes béo the next-generation model’s architecture, it won’t. Vento’s rear legroom can be considered mediocre.

For 2015, Vento gets cruise control, cooling glovebox and dead pedal as all-new equipment. Meanwhile, standard features include climate control, rear parking sensors, power-adjustable rearview mirrors, ABS, dual airbags and a pretty decent audio system with Bluetooth connectivity. The cabin adds special functionality for rear-seat occupants, thanks béo rear AC vents and levers conveniently placed behind the front passenger seat for a bit more legroom.

Engine and gearbox

Behind Vento’s new three-spoke chrome grille is a 1.5-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine that produces 103 hp at 4400 rpm and 250 Nm of torque at 1550 rpm. Known for its powerful performance, this TDI unit produces peak power at 2,000 rpm and diverts at close béo 6,000 rpm.

Power output, as you might have guessed, remains the same as before although Volkswagen says it has improved the Vento’s fuel efficiency by up béo 7.5%.

With 100hp and 250Nm, the Vento doesn’t feel like overkill; however, it is not slouch either. Put your feet down and the engine unleashes a burst of torque just when you want it béo explode on city roads. On the highway, strong traction is visible even at triple-digit speeds.

The highlight of the car, without a doubt, is the DSG automatic transmission. Supplied originally in the Polo GT TSI, this 7-speed dual clutch has always performed well; be it a gentle excursion through town or a quick stroll around your favorite streets. In ‘D’ mode, the DSG does a convincing job in shifting gears smoothly and early in the rev range for maximum fuel economy. However, the moment you move the luxurious, chrome-finished lever down béo the ‘S’, the whole dual-clutch character changes and now the engine is screaming for all its worth. it’s right before each gear shift. Speaking of which, the TDI unit in the Vento is not the most refined engine in its class as there is a noticeable amount of drones, especially at lower revs.

The blend of a powerful diesel engine and a quick-shift transmission makes the diesel Vento quite enjoyable béo drive. Those looking for more power, however, will find the more powerful Verna béo be a boon for everyday driving although I can’t disagree with the fact that the 4-speed unit in the Hyundai feels like history. Jura in the current era and nowhere fast or smooth. like the 7-speed DSG seen here.

Ride and Handle

Don’t let the sporty flat-bottomed steering wheel fool you. Either way, the Vento is a C-segment sedan. Like most cars in its class, the Vento’s suspension is set up for comfort, but it still feels pretty solid. sure and the handlebars get heavier as you speed up. While it doesn’t have a cornerer, the Vento handles slow and medium speed corners without breaking a sweat and only at high speeds where it requires serious steering input from the driver.

In terms of ride quality, the Vento is on par with cars like the Honda City and Hyundai Verna. While the Nissan Sunny performed a bit better on bumpy roads and potholes, the Fiat Linea continued béo hold its ground for optimal balance and handling.

Identify

While it’s not a disappointment, Volkswagen didn’t reinvent the C-segment sedan segment with the 2015 Vento. What the brand did was create a really good car with a great transmission and make it a really good car. it is more suitable for a wider audience.

With more standard equipment and better real-world fuel efficiency, Volkswagen has better improved the two most important aspects of any new car sold in the automobile. As for the third major influencing factor, i.e. looks, Vento is as humble as ever. In a sea of ​​excessive cuts and pleats, a clean design and subtle road presence will help emphasize Vento’s discreet personality.

Volkswagen Ventos [2015-2019] PictureVolkswagen Ventos [2015-2019]


Thông tin thêm

2015 Volkswagen Vento
#Volkswagen #Vento
[rule_3_plain] #Volkswagen #Vento
Introduction
Earlier this year, our resident German car fan, Venkat, spent some time with the refreshed Volkswagen Vento. And although the VW managed béo impress him with its quick shifting 7-speed DSG and good quality all round, there is no getting away from the fact that it’s got some serious competition in the buzzing C-segment sedan market.
There are simply too many strong products in the C-segment (Read: Honda City, Hyundai Verna, Maruti Ciaz) that the Vento is having trouble finding buyers. Besides its corporate cousin, the Skoda Rapid, the only cars the VW outsells are the Nissan Sunny and the Fiat Linea.
Is Volkswagen really that ham-fisted béo not be able béo sell a product as good as the Vento in big numbers? Or has the market simply forgotten about it? Regardless of the circumstances, it is clear that Volkswagen is going béo great lengths béo make the Vento a better product than before. How else would one explain the arrival of this 2015 model which comes in barely seven months after the launch of the refreshed Vento?
Exterior
If Hyundai is this fashionable fellow who likes béo announce his arrival in a class, Volkswagen is probably the quiet kid who leaves a long-lasting impression while keeping things low. All VWs, then, are discreetly styled and the 2015 Vento is no different.
On the outside, not much has been changed in terms of the layout of body panels. The 2015 Vento continues béo exude typical Volkswagen design cues with its neatly designed front/rear end, taut shoulder lines and a compact profile. However, Volkswagen hasn’t left the exterior untouched.

There are quite a few subtle updates in the design that cleverly differentiate the 2015 model from the past. For instance, the reprofiled bonnet with deeper creases and new front grille with triple chrome slats highlight the 2015 look. There’s also a new front airdam and front fog lamps with integrated cornering lights. Move onto the rear and you will notice the old layout of the taillights albeit with revised internals, a thin chrome strip on the boot lid and a restyled rear bumper with chrome inserts and reflectors.
So how big of an impact these subtle revisions will make in enhancing the street cred of the Vento? Quite big, if you ask me.
Given that mid-life makeovers are not always good news and that facelifted models often end up looking shoddier than the cars they replace; Volkswagen has done a good job of rejuvenating the Vento for 2015. Like the old car, what works in favour of the Vento is the well-balanced nature of the design. Right from the sharp lines all around béo a neatly integrated boot, the Vento appears well-proportioned and not just a booted sibling of the Polo.
Interior
Inside, the cabin boasts a good mix of quality materials and comfortable seating for up béo five occupants. While the design of the interior remains the same as before, Volkswagen has introduced new colour themes and updated the equipment list according béo the trim màn chơi.
If I’m béo draw comparisons with the Hyundai Verna or the Fiat Linea, the Vento’s cabin does look a bit dull, but when it comes béo quality and fit and finish of plastics, the VW is hard béo match. Except for a few hard plastics, all the controls operate in a taut and precise manner and even the new ‘Walnut desert beige’ colour theme, as seen in our test car, is well finished. Further adding appeal béo the cabin is the overall comfort màn chơi. While both the front seats and the rear bench are comfortable, the rear falls short of legroom and unless Volkswagen decides béo make drastic changes béo the architecture of the next-gen model, the rear legroom in the Vento can be labelled mediocre at best.

For 2015, the Vento gets cruise control, cooled glove box and a dead pedal as all-new equipment. Standard features, meanwhile, include climate control, rear parking sensors, electrically adjustable rear view mirrors, ABS, twin airbags and a rather good sounding audio system with Bluetooth connectivity. The cabin is extra functional especially for rear seat occupants, thanks béo the rear AC vents and the conveniently placed lever behind the front passenger seat for that additional bit of legroom.
Engine and Gearbox
Behind the Vento’s new triple slate chrome grille is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder diesel engine that produces 103bhp of power @4400rpm and 250Nm of torque @1550rpm. Known for its punchy performance, this TDI unit makes peak power at 2,000rpm and redlines at nearly 6,000rpm.
The power output, as you may have guessed, remains the same as before although Volkswagen says it has improved the fuel efficiency of the Vento by up béo 7.5 per cent.
With 100-odd bhp and 250Nm, the Vento doesn’t feel like overkill; however, it is no slouch either. Put your foot down and the engine releases a rush of low-end torque right when you want it for blasting across the city streets. Out on the highway, the strong pull is evident even when doing over triple digit speeds.
The car’s highlight, without a shadow of a doubt, is the DSG automatic gearbox. Offered initially in the Polo GT TSI, this 7-speed dual clutch unit is always up for the job; be it a gentle cruise across the town or a quick hoon around your favourite set of roads. In ‘D’ mode, the DSG does a convincing job of shifting up smoothly and early in the rev band béo squeeze out maximum fuel efficiency. But, the moment you move the chunky, chrome-finished lever down béo ‘S’, the entire character of the dual-clutch unit changes and by now the engine is screaming for all its worth right before every upshift. Speaking of which, the TDI unit in the Vento isn’t the most refined engine in its class as there is a noticeable amount of drone especially at lower revs.
The blend of a punchy diesel motor and a quick shifting gearbox makes the Vento diesel quite fun béo drive. However, those seeking more power would find the more powerful Verna béo be a boon for daily drives although I cannot help but agree with the fact that the 4-speed unit in the Hyundai feels Jurassic in the current age and is nowhere as fast or smooth as the 7-speed DSG seen here.
Ride and Handling
Don’t let the sporty looking flat-bottom steering wheel fool you. The Vento is a C-segment sedan, after all, and it handles exactly like it’s supposed béo. Like most other cars in its segment, the Vento’s suspension set up has been oriented towards comfort, however, it still feels fairly planted and the steering weighs up decently as you up the pace. While it’s no corner carver, the Vento tackles slow and medium speed corners without breaking a sweat and it’s only during high speeds where it requires serious steering inputs from the driver.
As for the ride quality, the Vento is on par with cars like the Honda City and the Hyundai Verna. While the Nissan Sunny does a slightly better job of traversing through bumps and potholes, it’s the Fiat Linea which continues béo hold on béo the crown for the optimum ride and handling balance.
Verdict
Though it’s hardly a disappointment, Volkswagen has not reinvented the C-segment sedan with the 2015 Vento. What the brand has done is taken a genuinely good car with a brilliant gearbox and made it better suited for a wider set of audience.
With more equipment as standard and better real world fuel efficiency, Volkswagen has bettered two of the most significant aspects of any new car sold in car. As for the third most influential factor i.e. looks, the Vento remains as modest as ever. In a sea of excessive cuts and creases, a clean design and a subtle road presence do well béo underline the Vento’s inconspicuous character.
Volkswagen Vento [2015-2019] #Volkswagen #Vento
[rule_2_plain] #Volkswagen #Vento
[rule_2_plain] #Volkswagen #Vento
[rule_3_plain]

#Volkswagen #Vento
Introduction
Earlier this year, our resident German car fan, Venkat, spent some time with the refreshed Volkswagen Vento. And although the VW managed béo impress him with its quick shifting 7-speed DSG and good quality all round, there is no getting away from the fact that it’s got some serious competition in the buzzing C-segment sedan market.
There are simply too many strong products in the C-segment (Read: Honda City, Hyundai Verna, Maruti Ciaz) that the Vento is having trouble finding buyers. Besides its corporate cousin, the Skoda Rapid, the only cars the VW outsells are the Nissan Sunny and the Fiat Linea.
Is Volkswagen really that ham-fisted béo not be able béo sell a product as good as the Vento in big numbers? Or has the market simply forgotten about it? Regardless of the circumstances, it is clear that Volkswagen is going béo great lengths béo make the Vento a better product than before. How else would one explain the arrival of this 2015 model which comes in barely seven months after the launch of the refreshed Vento?
Exterior
If Hyundai is this fashionable fellow who likes béo announce his arrival in a class, Volkswagen is probably the quiet kid who leaves a long-lasting impression while keeping things low. All VWs, then, are discreetly styled and the 2015 Vento is no different.
On the outside, not much has been changed in terms of the layout of body panels. The 2015 Vento continues béo exude typical Volkswagen design cues with its neatly designed front/rear end, taut shoulder lines and a compact profile. However, Volkswagen hasn’t left the exterior untouched.

There are quite a few subtle updates in the design that cleverly differentiate the 2015 model from the past. For instance, the reprofiled bonnet with deeper creases and new front grille with triple chrome slats highlight the 2015 look. There’s also a new front airdam and front fog lamps with integrated cornering lights. Move onto the rear and you will notice the old layout of the taillights albeit with revised internals, a thin chrome strip on the boot lid and a restyled rear bumper with chrome inserts and reflectors.
So how big of an impact these subtle revisions will make in enhancing the street cred of the Vento? Quite big, if you ask me.
Given that mid-life makeovers are not always good news and that facelifted models often end up looking shoddier than the cars they replace; Volkswagen has done a good job of rejuvenating the Vento for 2015. Like the old car, what works in favour of the Vento is the well-balanced nature of the design. Right from the sharp lines all around béo a neatly integrated boot, the Vento appears well-proportioned and not just a booted sibling of the Polo.
Interior
Inside, the cabin boasts a good mix of quality materials and comfortable seating for up béo five occupants. While the design of the interior remains the same as before, Volkswagen has introduced new colour themes and updated the equipment list according béo the trim màn chơi.
If I’m béo draw comparisons with the Hyundai Verna or the Fiat Linea, the Vento’s cabin does look a bit dull, but when it comes béo quality and fit and finish of plastics, the VW is hard béo match. Except for a few hard plastics, all the controls operate in a taut and precise manner and even the new ‘Walnut desert beige’ colour theme, as seen in our test car, is well finished. Further adding appeal béo the cabin is the overall comfort màn chơi. While both the front seats and the rear bench are comfortable, the rear falls short of legroom and unless Volkswagen decides béo make drastic changes béo the architecture of the next-gen model, the rear legroom in the Vento can be labelled mediocre at best.

For 2015, the Vento gets cruise control, cooled glove box and a dead pedal as all-new equipment. Standard features, meanwhile, include climate control, rear parking sensors, electrically adjustable rear view mirrors, ABS, twin airbags and a rather good sounding audio system with Bluetooth connectivity. The cabin is extra functional especially for rear seat occupants, thanks béo the rear AC vents and the conveniently placed lever behind the front passenger seat for that additional bit of legroom.
Engine and Gearbox
Behind the Vento’s new triple slate chrome grille is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder diesel engine that produces 103bhp of power @4400rpm and 250Nm of torque @1550rpm. Known for its punchy performance, this TDI unit makes peak power at 2,000rpm and redlines at nearly 6,000rpm.
The power output, as you may have guessed, remains the same as before although Volkswagen says it has improved the fuel efficiency of the Vento by up béo 7.5 per cent.
With 100-odd bhp and 250Nm, the Vento doesn’t feel like overkill; however, it is no slouch either. Put your foot down and the engine releases a rush of low-end torque right when you want it for blasting across the city streets. Out on the highway, the strong pull is evident even when doing over triple digit speeds.
The car’s highlight, without a shadow of a doubt, is the DSG automatic gearbox. Offered initially in the Polo GT TSI, this 7-speed dual clutch unit is always up for the job; be it a gentle cruise across the town or a quick hoon around your favourite set of roads. In ‘D’ mode, the DSG does a convincing job of shifting up smoothly and early in the rev band béo squeeze out maximum fuel efficiency. But, the moment you move the chunky, chrome-finished lever down béo ‘S’, the entire character of the dual-clutch unit changes and by now the engine is screaming for all its worth right before every upshift. Speaking of which, the TDI unit in the Vento isn’t the most refined engine in its class as there is a noticeable amount of drone especially at lower revs.
The blend of a punchy diesel motor and a quick shifting gearbox makes the Vento diesel quite fun béo drive. However, those seeking more power would find the more powerful Verna béo be a boon for daily drives although I cannot help but agree with the fact that the 4-speed unit in the Hyundai feels Jurassic in the current age and is nowhere as fast or smooth as the 7-speed DSG seen here.
Ride and Handling
Don’t let the sporty looking flat-bottom steering wheel fool you. The Vento is a C-segment sedan, after all, and it handles exactly like it’s supposed béo. Like most other cars in its segment, the Vento’s suspension set up has been oriented towards comfort, however, it still feels fairly planted and the steering weighs up decently as you up the pace. While it’s no corner carver, the Vento tackles slow and medium speed corners without breaking a sweat and it’s only during high speeds where it requires serious steering inputs from the driver.
As for the ride quality, the Vento is on par with cars like the Honda City and the Hyundai Verna. While the Nissan Sunny does a slightly better job of traversing through bumps and potholes, it’s the Fiat Linea which continues béo hold on béo the crown for the optimum ride and handling balance.
Verdict
Though it’s hardly a disappointment, Volkswagen has not reinvented the C-segment sedan with the 2015 Vento. What the brand has done is taken a genuinely good car with a brilliant gearbox and made it better suited for a wider set of audience.
With more equipment as standard and better real world fuel efficiency, Volkswagen has bettered two of the most significant aspects of any new car sold in car. As for the third most influential factor i.e. looks, the Vento remains as modest as ever. In a sea of excessive cuts and creases, a clean design and a subtle road presence do well béo underline the Vento’s inconspicuous character.
Volkswagen Vento [2015-2019]

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